Fall Photo Walk, November 3

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The peak of leaf season is upon us. We’ve had entirely too many rainy days this week. I took advantage of the sunny skies this morning and took a walk through a local park that is heavy on sugar maples. Alas, there is too much to do this weekend or else I’d devote the entire day to capturing local scenery.

Does anyone else suddenly go cold at the thought of narrating one’s life? This happens to me from time to time, and it is not a good thing when one has a personal blog. It’s not that things are so bad that I’m better off not writing about them. Actually, matters have improved greatly since earlier in the year. I’m in less pain. My daughter seems to be enjoying school. Still, I haven’t felt inclined to write about the day to day.

I do have yet another bit of medical drama, but I don’t think the matter is anything serious. I’ve had periodic migraines since I was ten years old, but I had a migraine with aura for the very first time last month. My neurologist ordered a brain MRI. My appointment for the MRI review won’t happen until later this week, but I did get a disc copy of it per the ordering doctor’s request. Of course, I had to find a way to view the images on that disc before my appointment. Now that I’ve viewed those pictures, I feel like I’ve partaken of a forbidden fruit. The physical contents of one’s head are far from beautiful, to say the least.

And now I will close with more photos from this morning’s walk:

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Fall Photo Walk, October 21

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Leaf season is far from its peak. Most of the red maples have changed color, but other varieties of trees aren’t showing much color below their canopies.

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Yesterday’s Fall Photo Walk

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I hated winter until I learned that I needed it. I spent four winters away from Ohio, in places where a 45-degree dawn was hailed as the start to a frigid day.  Each winter away from the Snowbelt would begin with a feeling of escape from a harsh fate and end with a sense of impending madness. I needed the deep rest that only a classic, frosty winter can offer.

While winter has not arrived yet, the temperatures have been cold enough to suggest that it’s getting time to bring out the blankets and sweaters, that there is no time like the present to dust off the books you’ve been meaning to read. The time has also changed, so there’s not enough light to get much done outside before or after work.

I had hoped for sunshine yesterday, but the skies were also gathering a blanket against the cold. The temperatures hovered in the low 20’s during my photo walk. The oaks, with their russet tones, are reigning now. Just a few sweetgum trees are blazing red. Last the willows and Bradford pear trees will change color before all of the trees slip into their winter’s rest.

(This post is also my entry in the Weekly’s Photo Challenge’s theme of Temporary.)

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Fall Photo Walk, November 4

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The weather was gloomy today: deeply overcast skies with the threat of rain. The temperatures hovered in the low 40’s, but I ventured to my favorite local park, determined to conquer the challenge of capturing leaf season during cloudy weather.

I fiddled with some of the settings on my camera, dialing up the ISO and adjusting the white balance. I learned that there is more drama in low light than I suspected.

Fall Photo Walk, October 28

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The season has definitely made its equivalent of a presidential pivot toward the more serious business of getting all the flora and fauna to prepare for winter. When I ventured out this morning, the temperature was just 37 degrees with very elusive light. I think I may have wasted most of the day’s meager portion of direct sunlight just driving to the park, which is just 20 minutes from my house.

I’m not keen on taking pictures on overcast days. I suppose I shouldn’t rely so heavily on the direct sun for my pictures, but my preference runs strongly to bright light, even if its shadows obscure some details. The clouds conquered the light early in my walk today. I tried my best with these conditions, but I keep thinking I’d like a “do over” on today’s walk.

As for the more positive aspects of this morning’s walk, I spotted a raccoon taking a dip in the park’s pond:

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I also spotted this fallen tree that looks like it is ready to settle in for the proverbial long winter’s nap:

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I’m hoping for a sunnier day tomorrow to capture more of the season’s color. We’re as close to the peak of leaf season as we’ll get this year.

Another image from yesterday’s photo walk

This one is from my budget smart phone. Who still uses “budget” as an adjective? I think such usage is a symptom of impending middle age. 

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I don’t like taking pictures with my phone. Compared to the clarity I enjoy with my DSLR cameras, my phone’s lens seems a distant last resort. Over the past couple weeks, I’ve tried my best to see its limitations as an opportunity for growth. The capacity to compose a good picture and to capture unexpected moments is essential to photography. There is no reason why I can’t accomplish those two goals with my phone camera.

Last weekend I took this picture while gazing up at the canopy of a forest dominated with sugar maples:

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Had I used my DSLR, I doubt I would have opted for a wide angle that showed all the layers of change in this little patch of forest. There would have been little green in my telephoto shot. In using my phone, I could only opt for the wide angle, which proved to be the best vantage point in this scene.

Layered