Garden, September 24

The heat still rages and is expected to linger through most of the coming week. My petunias are loving this sweltering weather. My hanging baskets have endured the heat with a daily watering.

My tolerance for extreme temperatures diminishes with each passing year. I seem to remember writing last year that eventually I may be left with a ten-degree zone of comfort, likely 60 to 70 degrees with just enough overcast and rainy days for plants to thrive.

While I will not miss these 85 to 90 degrees when they pass, I take solace in the fact they are stalling the start of freezing temperatures that will halt this year’s garden by mid-fall.

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Garden, September 17

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Our summer-ending heatwave has enlivened the garden. The second batch of buds is swelling on my hibiscus bush, so it is looking more likely to rebloom like it did last year:

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The petunias are loving this heat:

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Garden, September 10

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I’d be remiss if I didn’t make a weekly garden post before the first frost hits us, an event which has an unknown date as of yet.

My hanging baskets are loving the cool nights and moderate days, but they’ve demanded a daily watering. I think this is a sign that they are wearing their baskets like painted on jeans.

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Magic of the Moment

This week I’ve been trying to build my video skills. Hearkening to the title of this blog, there’s been plenty of intensity without mastery along the way. My interest in video is to capture more of the magic of the sort of moments I’m drawn to photograph.

I love watching the flowers in my garden flutter in the breeze. Here’s a little YouTube clip of my fuschia basket holding its own against this blustery September day:


I am excited at the prospect of filming clips of the fall leaves. I need to find a way to steady my camera for a walk through my favorite forest trail while the sugar maples are ablaze.

Garden, September 3

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I’m lingering more in the garden because its days for 2017 are coming to a close. Inevitably the weather will turn too harsh to sustain these flowers. The unknown is how long the growing season will last. The first frost could come anytime between the middle of September and the beginning of November.

Last year the flowers were still in bloom a week after Halloween, but I cannot depend on a similar season this year. The temperature dipped to the high forties during a couple nights this week. My hibiscus bush is growing new leaves for a second bloom, but I don’t think the warmth will endure long enough for an encore bloom like last year.

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Mystery Sunflower

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I sowed four varieties of sunflowers this year, yet just one of them bloomed as expected. All of these were grown from Burpee seed, which has been a reliable brand in my experience until this year. The Lemon Queen bloomed as depicted on the seed packet. The other three did not prove to be quite so accurate or abundant.

None of the Mammoth Russian seeds germinated. My Autumn Beauty has only yellow blooms instead of a variety of yellow/orange bicolor flowers. The picture shown above is what bloomed from a packet of Teddy Bear sunflower seeds. I’m not sure what variety this flower is, but it is not Teddy Bear, which has many rows of small wispy petals unfurling from the outside in as the bloom matures. I grew a Teddy Bear sunflower with my daughter when she was very young to teach her how to sow seeds and care for an easy plant. It did not look like this sunflower, except for its short height.

Garden, August 26

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The sunflowers have attracted lots of honey bees and leatherwing beetles. Both are so content with their feast that they don’t seem to notice my milling about with my camera.

Hummingbirds have been visiting my calibrachoa baskets, but they fly away as soon as I start opening my back door.

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