Petunia at Dusk

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I so wish I had a fine dashboard camera, for I tend to drive right past the more ideal photo moments I encounter. This evening I saw a full rainbow emerge from a sunburst between rain showers. The best vantage point was literally from my driver’s seat. I suppose that the optics of dashboard cameras are fixed focus and wide angle. I’d get home, review the pictures, and regret that I could not have zoomed in on whatever subject matter captivated my interest while I was driving.

I tried to cap my evening with some pictures of raindrops on the flowers in my garden, but I was not successful. The above picture was the best of the lot. It’s missing the rain I wanted to capture, but it does have some unexpected bokeh in the frame.

My petunias did not delight me as much as the oddball vehicle I spotted on the way home from work earlier this week. If I had a dashboard cam, I’d have blogged a picture of a full-size tanker truck clad with Dum Dums sucker graphics on the tank and the cab. This truck was blazing its fully saturated colors in the sunlight, and it wasn’t merely advertising this treat. This truck belonged to the Spangler Candy Company, the maker of Dum Dums. This company is located about 65 miles north of here in Bryan, Ohio.

I wondered if that tanker was filled with candy base and if it would be possible to supersaturate that solution with more sweetener by driving that truck through a heat wave. The temperature outside was 90 degrees at the moment I spotted it.

The Dum-Dums tanker wasn’t as strange as one vehicle I spotted while driving over an overpass last spring. It was one of those car carrier trucks, and its trailer was not attached. Instead, it was hauling two truck cabs just like itself. If I only I had a pictures of that oddity as it climbed and crested the overpass!

Summer Photo Walk, June 1

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The solstice is still three weeks away, but summer is here, nonetheless. I like to hold onto this season for as long as possible. For me, it’s here by Memorial Day, and I let it linger until its proper end at the September equinox.

The peonies are nearly spent, and the irises have lost their blooms. Now is when hothouse-born annuals can safely sing their melodies that will be encored ceaselessly until frost silences them in the fall.

Trees and bushes are still flowering. I noticed that dogwood and spirea are in bloom. Milkweed plants are fat with buds which will host a smorgasboard for butterflies near the end of the month.

Smorgasbord . . . this term has grown archaic, hasn’t it? It brings to mind a bizarre Jerry Lewis movie called Cracking Up, wherein he plays a character who tries therapeutic hypnosis. Hearing his trigger word (which happens to be smorgasbord) has unpredictable results. The guy who played Stan on The Golden Girls is his therapist in the movie. This reminds that I should watch that movie again sometime.

First Echinacea

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I added a couple of these perennials to my garden just last year, after they’d already started blooming. It seems rather early for its first bloom. Echinacea is such a dependable presence in summer gardens around here that I haven’t paid attention to their usual timing. I think of them as mid to late summer flowers, but I guess I didn’t realize they could endure through part of spring and all of summer.

Toad Flax

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My daughter and I grew this wildflower from a dollar store mixed seed packet the summer of our tantrum-laced zoo visit. Tending to this garden was definitely a highlight of an otherwise tough year.

Sniff

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Close-up of my late cat Fian. He’s been gone for five years now, and I still mention him at least once every day. It’d be my luck that the first cat I had accepted me only begrudgingly until he became an old man. He’d be more likely to greet me with a hiss than a meow, but I loved him, anyway.

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