Still searching for answers

I’ve had yet another lengthy flare-up of nerve pain. I waited to write because, really, what is the point of peeling that onion of anger and frustration once again? It’s not like this nerve pain recedes completely. It’s been a faithful visitor to me for decades (since age 11). Its visits have become frequent and longer lasting over the years, especially in the past year and a half, with the exception of the six month period immediately following my spine surgery. I had minimal nerve pain during those six months. It’s possible that I lost of bit of my “tolerance” for this pain during those six months, kind of like how one needs to get acclimated to cold all over again at the beginning of winter. Still, you’d think I’d have built that tolerance back by now.

It’s becoming clearer to me that I may not find an answer or a ready narrative for my pain. I recently read a book called Drug Dealer, MD by Anne Lembke, MD (Johns Hopkins Press). While this volume is really a textbook for college classes addressing the opiate crisis, it did have some concepts I found very helpful to my situation. Lembke stresses that story creation is a fundamental part of both culture and identity.  Like every culture, mine has common stories about illness, about pain. There’s a good chance I’m going to pursue one or more those stories to get relief, and the doctors who have treated me and will treat me have their own stories.

I feel lucky that one particular story was not available to me: long-term opiate therapy. Had I gotten surgery for my ruptured L4/L5 disc earlier in time (and my disc ruptured many years ago, unbeknownst to me, actually), this may have turned out differently. I think it was a bad collision of opportunism on one side and compassion on the other that lead to a whole generation of back pain patients getting hooked on opiates. No one can convince me that opiates work long-term at safe doses, and I don’t think they help with nerve pain. There’s also the proverbial elephant in the room, or the colon, if you will, constipation. Why in the world in the world would I want to lay a pile of bricks and mortar on top of the mess I’ve already got going on down there?

I used the term back pain the preceding paragraph, but that is also a source of contention for me. In reality, I don’t often have back pain, and when I do, it quickly resolves itself. No matter how many times I’ve tried to correct the matter in the past and present tense, my appointment records and the like still indicate that I have back pain. Is there is just no diagnostic category for what ails me? I have spinal stenosis, assorted bad discs, and the like. I have radicular nerve pain that is intermittent and moderate to severe when it flares up. Years ago I saw an electrical storm from a highway in the New Mexico desert. The nerve pain feels like that storm looked.

The pain seems to be a function in part of the pace of my movement. This is most evident when I am walking. Slow walking or waiting in line can be an agony to me, but faster walking usually gives me no trouble. Why is it that I can walk miles in a day but I can’t stand in place for more than a couple minutes?

This is the moment when I recall something that my sister, who is a fellow nerve pain/spinal stenosis patient, used to say to me in the midst of our various sibling rivalries, “Nobody knows and nobody cares.”

That may sound radically cynical, but there’s a vital truth in it for chronic pain patients: you are chronic because nobody yet knows how to fix your pain, and if they do not care, do not go back.

I don’t know where to turn next for getting treatment for this nerve pain. The first thing I’ve learned is that any treatment can have unintended consequences. When I had L4/L5 fusion with disc replacement last year, the indication was advanced disc degeneration and severe spinal stenosis. I had significant numbness in my left leg, urinary issues, and the like. I did have sciatica in the months leading up the surgery, but nothing as troubling as the nerve pain I’ve felt in the past nine months.

Long story short, surgery was the treatment of choice for what ailed me. I knew that the discs above the one replaced were not in great shape, but I did not think they would give me trouble so quickly. By the way, despite the nerve pain L3/L4 is generating, it is nowhere near qualifying for surgical removal. The one that did get removed, L4/L5, was so herniated it compressed my spinal cord on one side. It remains a mystery to me why it took so many years for me to feel pain or other symptoms from the L4/L5 rupture.

Next, I had the epidural injection. I wasn’t thrilled with this treatment. The relief I had was partial, and it lasted for six weeks. After this injection, I had nerve pain in new locations like my toes and neck. When the L3/L4 returned, it was mirrored to the right side, too. Now I have nerve pain in all four quadrants of my body. I cannot claim a cause-and-effect relationship here, but I will tell you to be very careful when you open the proverbial Pandora’s box of the central nervous system, especially if you come from a family with a history of migraine or fibromyalgia as I do. It’s not that I feel more pain than I did before I had the epidural; it’s coming from many more locations than it did before.

Back to the concept of story, I suppose it’s up to me to craft one of my own that helps me makes sense of what’s changed within me, one that does not rely on scalpels, syringes, or prescription drugs. We were human long before there were any cures. We loved, suffered, and triumphed before we knew what ailed us.

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